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CPA Central Spooky Trivia [Day Six]

With Halloween approaching quickly, CPA Central will be hosting a Spooky Trivia event in which a trivia question will be asked each day until Halloween.

Each day, a new trivia question will be posted on the site. Each correct answer will be worth 70 xats. As in the past, the first person to answer the question correctly will be awarded the prize. The subject of the questions will relate to the holiday, Halloween.

For those of you who are CPAC staff, xats will not be awarded if you chose to answer the question.

In addition to this, the individual who successfully answers the most questions can also win ad space for his or her army. With that said, let’s proceed to the question at hand.

Day 5 Winner: 

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Note- As said before, CPAC  staff are not permitted to compete in this contest. Therefore, Ben’s answer is voided and Legofan wins.

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The Question:

Where did Jack o’ lanterns originate?

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Once again, best of luck to all participants taking part in CPA Central’s Spooky Trivia.

Atticus

CPA Central Chief Executive Officer

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17 Responses

  1. The irish brought it to america where americans carved pumpkins but the irish did it carving turnips


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  2. Ireland. 😛

  3. Irish brought it to smirk america carved pumpkins but it started craving turnips

    • Irish brought it to america where they carved pumpkins but the irish carved turnips because they didn’t have pumpkins

  4. My ass crack

  5. Ireland!

  6. Ireland

  7. Ireland

    The practice of decorating “jack-o’-lanterns”—
    the name comes from an Irish folktale about a man named Stingy Jack—originated in Ireland, where large turnips and potatoes served as an early canvas.

  8. Jack O Lantern came from Ireland where they originally carved turnips.

  9. Ireland

  10. The name jack-o-lantern has meant a man with a lantern or a night watchman

  11. The practice of decorating “jack-o’-lanterns”-the name comes from an Irish folktale about a man named Stingy Jack-originated in Ireland, where large turnips and potatoes served as an early canvas.

  12. Ireland

  13. Annoying that my answer still hasn’t been approved.

    • That’s the point.

  14. People have been making jack-o-lanterns at Halloween for centuries. The practice originated from an Irish myth about a man nicknamed “Stingy Jack.” According to the story, Stingy Jack invited the Devil to have a drink with him. True to his name, Stingy Jack didn’t want to pay for his drink, so he convinced the Devil to turn himself into a coin that Jack could use to buy their drinks. Once the Devil did so, Jack decided to keep the money and put it into his pocket next to a silver cross, which prevented the Devil from changing back into his original form. Jack eventually freed the Devil, under the condition that he would not bother Jack for one year and that, should Jack die, he would not claim his soul. The next year, Jack again tricked the Devil into climbing into a tree to pick a piece of fruit. While he was up in the tree, Jack carved a sign of the cross into the tree’s bark so that the Devil could not come down until the Devil promised Jack not to bother him for ten more years.

    Soon after, Jack died. As the legend goes, God would not allow such an unsavory figure into heaven. The Devil, upset by the trick Jack had played on him and keeping his word not to claim his soul, would not allow Jack into hell. He sent Jack off into the dark night with only a burning coal to light his way. Jack put the coal into a carved out turnip and has been roaming the Earth with it ever since. The Irish began to refer to this ghostly figure as “Jack of the Lantern,” and then, simply “Jack O’Lantern.”

    In Ireland and Scotland, people began to make their own versions of Jack’s lanterns by carving scary faces into turnips or potatoes and placing them into windows or near doors to frighten away Stingy Jack and other wandering evil spirits. In England, large beets are used. Immigrants from these countries brought the jack o’lantern tradition with them when they came to the United States. They soon found that pumpkins, a fruit native to America, make perfect jack o’lanterns. my xat name is RuGregFromPGO find me at xat.com/redemptionforce i sure do love history about halloween

  15. lol

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